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Happy International Women’s Day! 10 Inspiring Quotes from Women in Tech

In honor of #InternationalWomensDay, we put together some of our favorite quotes from some seriously talented and motivational women in tech. Take notes and get inspired!

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#1 –   Ginni Rometty, first female CEO at IBM

“People are their first word critic, and it stops them from getting another experience because I could be better, if I was just ready yet, if I had one more thing. And that’s not it…You always have to do something that puts you in a zone you don’t know. Someone once told me growth and comfort do not coexist. And I think it’s a  really good thing to remember.”

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#2 –   Rebecca Garcia, Technical Head of Product at Next Caller

“It’s so easy for us to get caught up in negative patterns, versus seeing what positive change you can make. Especially for women and minorities, we need to learn to see challenges as stepping-stones instead of hurdles. They really can bring you experience and closer to your goals.”

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# 3 –  Michelle Haupt, Operations Engineer at NASA 

“One thing I always tell young girls: Never let anybody tell you you can’t do it. Growing up, they’d look at me like, ‘Really?’ Even when I did my college visit, I had someone tell me most people change their minds after the first year. I never gave up. Even when I was having teachers tell me, ‘Just take a break from math, you can take this class next year,’ I said, ‘No, I’m going to take it now.’ I kept pushing for it.”

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#4 –   Jean Bartik, Programmer at ENIAC

“I was told I’d never make it to VP rank because I was too outspoken. Maybe so, but I think men will always find an excuse for keeping women in their ‘place’. So, let’s make that place the executive suite and start more of our own companies.”

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#5 –   Megan Smith, Former CTO of the United States of America 

“If you can find something you’re really passionate about, jump on that. If you’re passionate about (something) and you bring your talent, you’ll be unstoppable.”

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#6 –   Lauren Mosenthal, CTO at Glassbreakers 

“Life is a series of building, testing, changing and iterating.”

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#7 –   Carla Meninsky, engineer for Atari 

“I was a bit of an artist, and somewhere along the way had gotten the idea that computers could be used for animation and artists, because in-betweening was so tedious…Of course, everyone thought I was nuts.”

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#8 –   Radia Perlman, AKA “Mother of the Internet”, IEEE fellow, inventor of Spanning-Tree Protocol           

 “The world would be a better place if more engineers, like me, hated technology. The stuff I design, if I’m successful, nobody will ever notice. Things will just work, and will be self-managing.”

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# 9 –  Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo and former engineer at Google 

“People ask me all the time, ‘What is it like to be a woman at Google?’ I’m not a woman at Google, I’m a geek at Google. And being a geek is just great. I’m a geek, I like to code, I even like to use spreadsheets when I cook.”

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#10 –    Kimberly Bryant, Founder and CEO of Black Girls Who Code and electrical engineer 

“Being able to push against that paradigm and push girls to the forefront, particularly girls of color, is going to make a tremendous difference in the industry in the years to come.”

 

Are you ready to get started with your career in tech? In honor of International Women’s Day, Hackbright Academy is offering $1,500 tuition scholarships for the 12-week immersive program until March 15! Apply here

Hackbright Academy is an engineering school for women in San Francisco dedicated to closing the gender gap in the tech industry.  

From Dental Assistant to Genentech Engineer: Meet Ruba Hassan

Ruba Hassan is a software engineer at Genentech who graduated from the Hackbright Academy fellowship in September. Before Hackbright, she was a dental assistant. A single mom, Ruba wanted to make life better for her and her daughter. Here’s how she changed her life by learning how to code.  

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Ruba Hassan, Hackbright alumna, has completely changed her life within the course of a year. Working as a dental assistant for 9 years, she realized she needed a change for her and her daughter. “I wanted a career change but wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do,” she says. “I live in the Peninsula, so I wanted to get into tech. Knowing there were many tech bootcamps, I proceeded to look into what each had to offer. I wanted something that I would enjoy and a career that would give me the flexibility to work from home if need be to spend more time with my daughter. I started taking a few online classes: HTML, CSS, and found it fun. That’s when I found Hackbright. They had a part-time class called ‘Intro to Programming’. It was two nights a week, and I met some amazing women. Those women became my best friends and we developed a support system.”

After the class, Ruba felt confident enough to apply for Hackbright’s fellowship, a 12-week intensive that prepares you for a career in tech. “It was the part-time class that really helped me with the application,” she says. “My advice to anyone thinking about getting into tech is to take one or two classes to see if you would enjoy coding or if you’d understand it – and then go from there.”

Ruba was on vacation with her daughter at Universal Studios when she received the email that changed her life. “I got the email saying I was accepted into the fellowship program, and it was life-changing for both myself and my daughter. I knew I could provide a better life for her.”

“Emotionally, I feel more confident, stronger as a woman and that I can do so much more. I’m a part of a group of scientists that are building a huge project. It’s empowering.”

From there, Ruba quit her job and started the 12-week fellowship program.

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“The fellowship experience was great, my classmates and I are best friends now and we got through the program together – no matter how challenging it got. The teachers are very helpful, the students are very helpful, and we learned from one another. They always said, ‘don’t worry, we’ll help you through it’ when things got challenging, and it really made me calm down and relax and realize that yes, I can do this.”

During the fellowship, everyone creates a project. The project that Ruba worked on happened to get her a job at Genentech after she graduated.

“I wanted to build a website for dental surgery. It’s an oral surgery scheduling app that’s built to allow patients to go online to the surgeon’s website to schedule the appointment on their own, texting a confirmation after the appointment has been made. It’s a real app based on my life experience in the dental industry.”

When interviewing with Genentech, the recruiters asked Ruba to “show them something you’re proud of” and that project is what got her the role as a software engineer at the company. Now, she’s building a website and working with scientists.

“Working at Genentech has been amazing,” Ruba says. “It’s a huge relief. Emotionally, I feel more confident, stronger as a woman and that I can do so much more. I’m a part of a group of scientists that are building a huge project. It’s empowering.” Ruba says her favorite part about her job is seeing her code live. “I’ve only been there a month and a half and I’ve seen my work go live on the website. That itself is more rewarding than anything else.”

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When it comes to the fellowship, Ruba says she couldn’t have found a better program. “As a mom, I had to go to school from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and make sure to drop off, pick up and take care of my daughter’s needs. It wasn’t easy, but I had support.  I would recommend the program for any woman or mother. People think they can’t do it because they have children – and that’s not true. It was a stressful 12 weeks in terms of picking up my daughter, but it’s a short period of time. Now I have the flexibility with work to spend more time with my daughter. I also will say that the Hackbright alumnae community was incredibly helpful with my job search.”

Hackbright Academy is the leading engineering school for women in San Francisco dedicated to closing the gender gap in the tech industry.  Learn more about Hackbright’s 12-week software engineering program Ruba completed.

Bootcamp Grads: A Tech Recruiter’s Dream

Some of our favorite hiring managers in San Francisco share successful experiences recruiting and hiring diverse engineering teams, from bootcamps like Hackbright Academy, to building healthy engineering cultures:

Pat Poels, VP Engineering, Eventbrite

“I don’t want to hire only very senior people who’ve been in the industry for 10 or 15 years. I want to have a mix of new ideas and new developers as well. Hackbright is a great channel for that. We call that ‘junior developer’ role a Software Engineer Level One. There are a lot of interesting problems to solve at Eventbrite, so we don’t really look for a certain kind of engineer from Hackbright Academy. We’re looking for people we think are a good fit for the company, people who we think are really smart and have a great potential to learn.”

Danny Chi, VP Engineering, Tripping

“I’d love to come to Hackbright Demo Night because you can meet over 20 candidates in one night. It provides individuality a chance. I’m currently mentoring for the fifth time at Hackbright Academy. Because I’m mentoring, I’ve participated in whiteboarding sessions and we’ve been able to meet candidates outside of the recruiting cycle. For example, a Hackbright graduate participated in a whiteboarding workshop I was at, and gave me her resume for consideration. We’ve interviewed 30 candidates for 3 engineering hires. This is the same hiring clip as hiring across other recruiting channels, so being a part of the Hackbright community is a win. My one recommendation for bootcamp grads is to add React or any type of JavaScript to your app, as this will help you differentiate yourself from computer science graduates who tend to be heavy on theory and backend work.”

Arup Chakrabarti, Director of Engineering, PagerDuty

“The biggest thing to remember is that new developers need to be able to show potential over their technical ability. Not that technical ability is not important, but there is only so much I can expect out of a junior candidate. Instead, I look for solid communication skills, a genuine passion for software, curiosity beyond what they have learned in school, and raw drive. The projects that students work on are a very good way to demonstrate these things. Every student should keep working on their projects after demo day and be ready to show that to potential hiring managers. The other thing that Hackbright graduates need to leverage is the fact that many have years of work experience vs. someone that I hire straight out of undergrad. They know how to show up to work and basic professional habits over fresh college grads. This is something I tell all of my students to point out when they are interviewing as that means they are inherently less risky to hire.”

Alex Bekker, Director of Engineering, Udemy

“Ignore what languages candidates have experience with and instead focus on what they are capable of producing with them. Regardless of experience, everyone starts at the bottom of the learning curve on day one of a new job, so it’s a question of how quickly they can learn and how high their ceiling is, both of which are answered by what they can do today with what they learned so far. At Udemy, we like to give candidates take home projects and have them present to the team rather than the typical phone screen and on-site whiteboarding process, which is all kinds of broken.”

Emma Lubin, Engineering Manager, GoDaddy

“Someone making a mid-career switch can leverage their previous professional experience and learn quickly. Leading small teams and shipping projects are accomplishments that hiring managers will look at even if they were achieved in a different industry. I condensed nearly a decade of biology research into a few lines on a resume, and devoted more space to descriptions of small coding class projects that were nowhere near that kind of accomplishment. I started getting attention to my resume only after I put ALL of my skills on it. Software engineering is a tool to solve a wide array of problems, and it needs engineers with diverse backgrounds and approaches — that’s one reason companies are hiring from bootcamps.”

Brina Lee, Engineering Manager, Quip

“We not only bring a more diverse group of team members onboard, but we also make them want to stay and to give Quip their best. That’s important: You need to focus not only on recruiting good people, but retaining them. We’ve seen that once we started bringing in a broader range of people who stick around, our diversity snowballed. That can work for any company. Once you’ve got your first woman in engineering, it’s a lot easier to hire your second. And third. And fourth…”

Learn more about bootcamp grads:

  • “Higher percentage of female [coding bootcamp] graduates offers a more diverse talent pool. Women attain just 14% of computer science degrees, whereas they represent between 36% and 40% of bootcamp graduates.” (1-page)
  • “Even at colleges with a high percentage of women CS grads, the numbers are still small. … 511 total women in 2013. If Google hired ALL these women, it would increase their female percentage by 1.5 percentage points, leaving the whole rest of the technology industry bereft of female new-college-grad hires.” (TechCrunch)
  • “Bootcamp grads are junior programmers. They have a lot to learn, and represent an investment on the part of a company that hires them. This is also true of recent college graduates. We’ve found bootcamp grads as a group to be better than college grads at web programming and writing clean, modular code, and worse at algorithms and understanding how computers work. All in all, we’ve had roughly equivalent success working with the two groups.” (TripleByte)

Interested in hiring brilliant grads of Hackbright Academy? Learn more about how to partner with Hackbright Academy to hire your next female software engineers!
Hackbright’s next recruiting evening is March 8, 2017 in San Francisco – join us!