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Repl.it Setup

Preparation

To follow along this intro course to Python and complete all the assignments we we will be using an online tool called repl.it.

Repl.it is a simple yet powerful online compiler, IDE, interpreter and interactive environment for programming languages. The name comes from the read-eval-print loop, the interactive top level used by languages like Python.

Let’s set up an account! Click here to register if you don’t already have a repl.it account.

Once you have an account, you can select a language to get started with the interpreter. We will, of course, choose Python! Click here to start your first Python repl session.

On the left you will see an editor and an interactive console on the right. You can write code in the editor then click on the run button at the top to execute your code. Alternatively, you can type an expression directly into the console on the right side of the screen and then hit Enter. Your expression will be evaluated and its result will be printed. Repeat until satisfied.

You can save your session (which we call a “repl”) and share it with others by clicking on either the share or save buttons above your editor. Both the editor’s content and the repl will be preserved and can be executed once again using the created link to continue from where you left off.

Saving does not preserve code directly entered into the console

In every module, we will ask you to complete a practice and a final assignment section. Whereas, the code for the final assignment will be directly entered into the repl editor on the left, the practice section should be completed in the interactive console. Since a repl session does not save the content entered in the console, you will have to copy and paste all the input/output in your console into the editor to submit your practice assignments.

Assignment

Make a yourlastname_info.py repl (for example, if your last name is ‘smith’: smith_info.py).

In your repl editor on the left, include the following line of Python code:

print "Hello, world"

When you hit run, it should look similar to this in the console on the right:

Python 2.7.10 (default, Jul 14 2015, 19:46:27)
[GCC 4.8.2] on linux
>
Hello, world
>